Sea Change: Can a Ferry Change the World?

Sea Change: Can a Ferry Change the World?

The world’s first commercial hydrogen fuel cell-powered, electric drive ferry nears working life. The world’s first commercial hydrogen fuel cell-powered, electric-drive ferry, Sea Change, is afloat in Bellingham, Wash., as it prepares for working life in San Francisco Bay. The 70-foot, 75-passenger catamaran ferry is owned by SWITCH Maritime and was built by All American Marine, Inc. (AAM) with other partners. Regulatory approval from the U.S. Coast Guard is complete with delivery estimated relatively soon, according to AAM. Sea Change is expected to complete several demonstration runs once in California before it is deployed as a commuter passenger vessel in…
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Crowley Maritime’s Newest Assist Tugboat Begins Working Life in Puget Sound

Crowley Maritime’s Newest Assist Tugboat Begins Working Life in Puget Sound

At the time of this writing, Crowley Maritime’s newest chartered assist tugboat, Athena, is being delivered to Puget Sound for its final sea trials and first days of working life. Athena was built by Diversified Marine and joins Crowley Maritime’s Ship Assist and Escort Services Group. The compact 77-foot assist tugboat is hull number 44 for Crowley Maritime and packs 6,386 horsepower thanks to two Caterpillar 3516E engines. The twin screws are direct drive with two 2,700-mm 4-blade props. According to Crowley, Athena delivers 90 short tons of bollard pull, making the new assist tugboat the most powerful for its…
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Brusco’s Partnership with Diversified Reaches 20 Years and 10 Tugs

Brusco’s Partnership with Diversified Reaches 20 Years and 10 Tugs

By Peter Marsh The Pacific Northwest has been the center for tug construction on the West Coast for at least the last 40 years, during which the azimuth stern drive (ASD) and the use of computer-aided lofting and cutting have revolutionized the way tugs are built and used. This has had the effect of allowing a typical ASD tug to become a multi-purpose craft: able to handle both ship-handling, escort and short hauling assignments with only slight additions to the deck gear. Today, naval architects are able to take their well-tested hull shapes and modify accommodation and machinery layouts using…
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