Svitzer Wins Sakhalin Extension

Svitzer Wins Sakhalin Extension

Copenhagen-based Svitzer has won a ten-year extension of its marine service contract with Sakhalin Energy Investment Company to provide towage services in support of the Sakhalin-II project off the West Coast of Russia, which it has been doing since 2007. The extension, which will come into effect during the final quarter of 2022, will cover the mooring of more than 1800 large gas carriers off Sakhalin using a fleet of 4 Robert Allen-designed ice-breaking tugs and 2 mooring vessels.
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Australia Contracts Icebreaker Replacement

Australia Contracts Icebreaker Replacement

The Australian Antarctic Division has contracted Luxembourg-based Maritime Construction Services (MCS) to resupply several Australian research stations in Antarctica between December of this year and March 2021 because of delays in construction of the new Australian icebreaker Nuyina by Holland’s Damen Group (see Pacific Maritime Magazine, Jan. 2020). For the work MCS will supply its ice-classed multi-purpose vessel Everest, a state-of-the-art 25,000-kW ship with 1,400 square meters of deck space and accommodation for 140 personnel in 100 cabins. The DP3 rated vessel, which is equipped with several deck cranes of varying capacity, will also be available for underwater work and…
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OOCL Orders Five Mega-Ships

OOCL Orders Five Mega-Ships

Hong Kong-based Orient Overseas Container Line, now a unit of China’s Cosco Shipping, has ordered five 23,000-TEU container ships from two Cosco yards at an en-bloc price of $778.4 million. Three of the vessels will be built by Nantong Cosco KHI Ship Engineering and two by Dalian Cosco KHI Ship Engineering. The five vessels are scheduled to be delivered between the first and fourth quarters of 2023 as the Chinese company moves forward with its plan to expand its fleet by nearly 50 percent to the one million TEU capacity mark over the next three years.
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Banks Ending Support for Offshore Drilling in the Arctic

Banks Ending Support for Offshore Drilling in the Arctic

The Switzerland-based UBS Bank has joined several other investment companies in pulling funding and support for new offshore drilling projects in the Arctic, a move that could affect future funding for oil and gas projects in Alaska. A number of US banks, including Wells Fargo & Co, Goldman Sachs and JPMorgan Chase, have already announced similar policy shifts, stating they were no longer supporting new projects in the region in an effort to tackle climate change. Although major oil companies in Alaska are not too dependent on banks for their projects because they can use their own cash flow, the…
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OSV for Fish Farm Supply

OSV for Fish Farm Supply

The Damen shipyard at Amsterdam has been contracted to convert the 7-year-old redundant platform supply vessel World Opal, built in 2013 for the World Wide Group, into the fish farm supply ship Eidsvaag Opal for a new joint venture established between Norway’s Eidsvaag and Skretting groups. Photo courtesy of Eidsvaag Gro
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Salvaged for Scrap

Salvaged for Scrap

The Maltese-flagged chemical tanker Blue Star, which ran aground last November on the Spanish coast near Corunna, is to be scrapped despite being successfully re-floated by SMIT Salvage. To have originally been towed to Spain’s Fene shipyard for repairs it was found that underwater hull damage to the 9,438-dwt vessel was more extensive than thought and the tug VB Hispania has been contracted to tow the vessel to Turkey for demolition.
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Canadian Navy Chooses  MAN Engines

Canadian Navy Chooses MAN Engines

Four large tugs being built by Quebec-based Ocean Industries to a Robert Allan 2400 design for the Canadian Navy will be powered by MAN engines fitted with Selective Catalytic Reduction technology. Each of the vessels will utilize twin MAN 12V175 engines to give a bollard pull of 60 tons and a service speed of 12 knots.
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Sailing Ship Pilgrim Sinks at Dana Point

Sailing Ship Pilgrim Sinks at Dana Point

The sailing ship Pilgrim sank at its berth in California’s Dana Point Harbor on March 29 and is not expected to be returned to service. The vessel, used by the Ocean Institute’s educational program, was built in 1945 as a three-masted schooner for trading in the Baltic Sea out of Denmark but was converted to its present configuration in 1975 at Lisbon, Portugal and brought to Dana Point six years later. Since then, more than 400,000 fourth and fifth-graders from throughout Southern California have spent nights on the ship as part of the Institute’s Living History program. Wendy Marshall, executive…
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Remote Pilotage at Suez Canal

Remote Pilotage at Suez Canal

In one of the more unique operations generated by the COVID-19 outbreak Costa Cruises’ 3,693-passenger capacity Costa Diadema was transited through the Suez Canal northbound on March 23 using remote pilotage because of 65 cases of possible infection on board. Four senior pilots guided the 1,004-foot long vessel from two escorting tugs, one positioned in front and one astern, using radar and minute-by-minute radio follow-up in full coordination with transit control offices and navigation monitoring stations along the waterway. In addition, the 2013-built cruise ship was transited well ahead of the day’s regularly scheduled northbound convoy and given a large…
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Chinese Heavylift Calls in BC

Chinese Heavylift Calls in BC

The 51,969-dwt Chinese heavylift ship Red Zen 1 arrived in Vancouver, British Columbia during mid-March with eight Chinese-manufactured barges on board, six for Mercury Towing and two for Seaspan. The 216.74-meter by 43-meter heavylifter was built five years ago by CIMC Raffles Offshore and currently sails under the Liberian flag. Photo courtesy of Robert Etchell.
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