From the Editor: Maritime Piracy

Although it mostly takes place on the other side of the world, maritime piracy can have far-reaching effects for the goods movement industry. When parts of the supply chain are attacked in regions of the world like Asia and Africa, it can lead to disruptions in the Pacific region in the form of vessel delays, ship reroutings and cargo adjustments. But the International Maritime Bureau, which is run by the International Chamber of Commerce, revealed some good news recently: during the first six months of 2021, the Bureau recorded the lowest number of reported piracy incidents for the first half…
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Port of Seattle Dismisses Police Chief

The Port of Seattle police Chief Rodney Covey has had his employment terminated by the port following a lengthy investigation into allegations of workplace misconduct, according to an Aug. 13 Seattle Times report. Covey, who had been on paid administrative leave since June 2020 was fired following completion of the investigation, according to two people who spoke to the Times on condition of anonymity. At the time of Covey’s suspension, port officials would not publicly specify the allegations against Covey that led to his being placed on leave. “These are workplace responsibility complaints that are directly related to allegations regarding…
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Shippers Redraw Perimeter of High Piracy Risk Area

Shipping groups have redrawn the perimeters of the so-called High Risk Area covering Yemen and Somalia due to a decrease in Somali piracy. As of Sept. 1, the High Risk Area (HRA) was set to be scaled back to cover the Yemeni and Somali territorial seas and exclusive economic zones to the east and south. The changes were agreed to by the Baltic & International Maritime Council (BIMCO), International Chamber of Shipping (ICS), the International Association of Dry Cargo Shipowners (INTERCARGO), the International Association of Independent Tanker Owners (INTERTANKO), and the Oil Companies International Marine Forum (OCIMF), representing the global…
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U.S. Navy Vessel Participates in West Africa Anti-Piracy Exercise

U.S. Navy expeditionary sea base (ESB) USS Hershel "Woody" Williams was in West Africa in early August to participate in maritime security training along with African maritime security authorities. They participated in a three-day sea training exercise with Nigerian offshore patrol vessels and members of Ghana’s Special Boat Squadron as part of efforts to contain growing piracy in the Gulf of Guinea. The USS Hershel “Woody” Williams is the first warship permanently assigned to the U.S. Africa Command area of responsibility. The U.S. shares a common interest with African partner nations in ensuring security, safety, and freedom of navigation on…
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Port of Oakland Gains 2 New First-Call Container Shipping Services

Matson Lines and Wan Hai Lines have each introduced first-call services at the Port of Oakland, meaning the shipping lines are now making their initial U.S. stop the Northern California seaport after sailing from Asia. Taipei-based Wan Hai Lines commenced its new service Aug. 8. Called the AA5, the route links Oakland with three Asian ports: Kaohsiung, Ningbo and Qingdao. This follows the July 27 launch of an Oakland-China first-call service operated by Matson Lines. The new Matson service calls Chinese ports in Ningbo and Shanghai and makes stops in Long Beach and Honolulu after visiting Oakland. According to the…
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Port of Long Beach Officially Completes Ultra-Modern Container Terminal

The Port of Long Beach has ushered in what it is calling “the next era of environmentally sustainable operations” with the completion of the Long Beach Container Terminal at Middle Harbor, which the port calls one of the most technologically advanced cargo facilities in the world. The third and final phase of the years-long LBCT project was officially proclaimed complete during a mid-August press conference at the 300-acre facility. “Developing this terminal has been one of the biggest and most challenging infrastructure projects in our history,” Port of Long Beach Executive Director Mario Cordero said during the press conference. Equipped…
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New Developments in High-Speed Marine Propulsion

Several factors are driving innovation in marine shipbuilding, with among the most important ones being the Clean Air Act and subsequent EPA and CARB regulations. In some cases, standards were set before the technology to meet those goals could be developed. Another factor is the need for high-speed vessels with novel missions, such as in wind farm development. This article looks at recent and upcoming propulsion systems within the context of a sampling of new vessels. San Francisco Bar Pilot Boat, Designer: Camarc Design, UK, Builder: Snow & Company, Seattle WA Snow & Company, Inc. of Seattle, Wash. is currently…
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Ferries Update – The Future is Green

When it comes to the next generation of passenger-only ferries, the future is green. West Coast ship makers are in the process of building vessels that are not only powerful enough to transport people and vehicles, but are constructed with advanced sustainability goals in mind, the kind of impact that can mean cleaner air in the long run. Here’s a look at what’s being built: Building Sea Change The name Sea Change is apropos for a ferry poised to advance the potential commercialization of fuel-cell powered marine vessels globally. Bellingham, Washington-based All American Marine has been at work on that…
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Saildrone Plans Fleet of Surveyor Vessels to Map Earth’s Oceans

As data from the Saildrone Surveyor was still being mapped after her maiden voyage from San Francisco to Honolulu, owners of the uncrewed, autonomous vessel powered primarily by renewable wind and solar energy were already planning a fleet of Surveyors to map the world. “This successful maiden voyage marks a revolution in our ability to understand our planet,” said Richard Jenkins, Saildrone founder and chief executive officer. “We have solved the challenge of reliable long-range, large-payload remote maritime operations. Offshore survey can now be accomplished without a large ship and crew.” The 72-foot long, 14-ton Surveyor arrived in Honolulu on…
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