Long Beach Port Completes Rail Project

Long Beach Port Completes Rail Project

The Port of Long Beach in late April revealed that it has completed construction of a new rail project that’s expected to increase efficiency of goods movement and reduce congestion on local roadways by shifting more cargo to trains. The “Double Track Access from Pier G to Pier J Project,” as it’s known, adds a second rail line running about 8,000-feet long that enables four terminals in the port’s south basin area to simultaneously handle arriving and departing trains. The project is a piece of the port’s ongoing infrastructure capital improvement program, which is aimed at shifting more cargo to…
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USCG Cutter Polar Star Returns from Operation Deep Freeze

USCG Cutter Polar Star Returns from Operation Deep Freeze

After 147 days traveling in Antarctica and the Southern Hemisphere for Operation Deep Freeze, the 140 crew members of the Seattle-based U.S. Coast Guard cutter Polar Star returned to the U.S., dry docking in Vallejo, Calif., for upgrades. Operation Deep Freeze is an annual mission supporting the National Science Foundation. During its most recent deployment, Polar Star made stops in Wellington and Lyttelton, New Zealand, and Hobart, Tasmania, Australia and hosted the U.S. Ambassador to New Zealand and the Royal New Zealand Navy. In Antarctica, the cutter moved through over 450 miles of pack ice and carved out a 37-mile…
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Saildrone CEO Recognized With Navy League Award

Saildrone CEO Recognized With Navy League Award

Saildrone founder and chief executive officer Richard Jenkins accepted the 2022 Albert A. Michelson Award from the Navy League of the United States for his company’s contribution to maritime forces. The award is presented annually to a “civilian scientist, technical innovator or group or organization that has demonstrated scientific or technical achievement that has resulted in a significant improvement in the strength of our maritime forces or to the enhancement of our industrial-technology base.” Jenkins received the award April 5 in ceremonies at the Sea Air Space Conference at the Gaylord National Convention Center in National Harbor, Md. Previous Michelson…
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USCG Cutter Cuttyhunk Decommissioned

USCG Cutter Cuttyhunk Decommissioned

One of the U.S. Coast Guard’s remaining 110-foot Island-class patrol vessels, the cutter Cuttyhunk, was decommissioned Thursday, May 5 in a ceremony at Air Station Port Angeles in Washington. Cuttyhunk was one of 37 remaining 110-foot Island-class patrol boats in service, and was the 22nd of 49 such vessels built. A fleet of 154-foot Sentinel-class cutters will replace the Island-class vessels, according to the USCG. The Cuttyhunk was commissioned in 1988 to support various USCG operations, including search and rescue, drug and fisheries enforcement and maritime homeland security. During its 34-year tenure, the vessel’s crew has accomplished more than 1,000…
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British Columbia’s Port of Vancouver Launches Cruise Season

British Columbia’s Port of Vancouver Launches Cruise Season

The 2022 cruise season at the Port of Vancouver launched in April with the inaugural visit of the Holland America Line ship Koningsdam to the port’s Canada Place cruise terminal. “We’re delighted to welcome cruise back to the Port of Vancouver after what has been a long two years,” said Robin Silvester, president and CEO of the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority, the federal agency mandated to enable Canada’s trade through the Port of Vancouver. The Port of Vancouver has welcomed cruise passengers to Vancouver for more than 40 years. However, in March 2020, as part of its COVID-19 response, the…
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Regional Update: British Columbia Ports

Regional Update: British Columbia Ports

It still surprises some people when they learn that the third-biggest and busiest seaport in North America—after Los Angeles and Long Beach—isn’t in California or Washington, but in the Canadian province of British Columbia. But it’s true: The Port of Vancouver, which boasts an overall size of 217.5 miles (350 kilometers), a land area of 1,000 hectares (2,471 acres) and a 16,000-hectare (39,536-acre) harbor, is the largest, busiest port in Canada. With a draft depth of 18.4 meters (60.3 feet) and 57 available berths, the POV is capable of accommodating some of the biggest container ships in existence. However, it…
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Sea Change: Can a Ferry Change the World?

Sea Change: Can a Ferry Change the World?

The world’s first commercial hydrogen fuel cell-powered, electric drive ferry nears working life. The world’s first commercial hydrogen fuel cell-powered, electric-drive ferry, Sea Change, is afloat in Bellingham, Wash., as it prepares for working life in San Francisco Bay. The 70-foot, 75-passenger catamaran ferry is owned by SWITCH Maritime and was built by All American Marine, Inc. (AAM) with other partners. Regulatory approval from the U.S. Coast Guard is complete with delivery estimated relatively soon, according to AAM. Sea Change is expected to complete several demonstration runs once in California before it is deployed as a commuter passenger vessel in…
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Port of San Diego, USS Midway Museum’s Proposed ‘Freedom Park’ Moves Forward

Port of San Diego, USS Midway Museum’s Proposed ‘Freedom Park’ Moves Forward

The Port of San Diego and USS Midway Museum are moving forward on a proposal to turn the Navy Pier into a public space to be named “Freedom Park,” the port announced April 13. Port commissioners inked a Memorandum of Understanding outlining financial commitments for the project—$11.7 million in federal stimulus funds and the museum’s contribution of at least $30 million. Work on the project involves demolishing the headhouse on the pier, finishing pile improvements and pier reinforcements and building out the park with features that honor San Diego’s military history, along with adding amenities, according to the port. “Our…
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Fuel and Propulsion

Fuel and Propulsion

As transportation moves toward modern, eco-friendly solutions on land, maritime vessels are keeping up with the curve with a focus on developing economically and environmentally friendly solutions. Several companies have recently announced innovations in fuel and propulsion systems on the market that will help marine vessels bridge the gap as they attempt to viably reach zero emissions. In an effort to fight climate change, the International Maritime Organization in 2018 adopted an initial strategy related to reducing greenhouse gas emissions from ships, with a vision of phasing them out within the century. The strategy aims to reduce the carbon intensity…
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Offshore Wind Towers  Make for Dangerous Seas

Offshore Wind Towers Make for Dangerous Seas

Maritime vessel operators need to be aware of new and heightened concerns about how offshore wind (OSW) towers can interfere with and degrade radar systems. Mariners can be impacted on at least two fronts, one being interference with marine vessel radar. According to a report released earlier this year by the National Academy of Sciences, wind towers undercut a radar’s central purpose: safety. The steel towers can distort information about a vessel’s relative location, a degradation that affects all vessel classes. Turbine blades clutter a radar’s display, resulting in an ambiguous and confusing picture for the operator. Correcting for these…
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